RAF or RAFAC commission, that is the question


#1

So here is the scenario. 21 yr old CI (former CWO) attends OASC as part of recruitment process for joining RAF as Officer. Smashes everything with flying colours, except the physical element of OASC; told to go away, sort fitness and return when they think they are ready to try again.

So, and here is the question, if they decide to leave applying for a number of years and join RAFAC, should they be able to use the banked performances at OASC to start RAFAC commissioning process?

We don’t use the physical element of OASC, so why go through OASC again, we don’t force ex-RAF officers to redo OASC if they join RAFAC, even though it could have been years since going through the mill at Cranwell. So could there be a quick phone call from Reg Comdt to check suitability; bingo, new potential Officer Cadet.

Thoughts and comments.


#2

Knowing how the RAFAC works…will have to do it all again


#3

Looks like the RAFAC getting the worst of the deal lol


#4

Im guessing that the CWO in question will have been recorded as failing OASC not recorded as passed parts w, x and y but failed z


#5

It works the other way, with some RAFAC commissioning candidates being encouraged to undertake the CBTs and medical and apply for regular - they don’t retake the Hangar Excersices, Group Discussion, Group Planning or Planning exercises AFAIK, however there will be questions specific to RAFAC that are not applicable to RAF and vice versa so I think the interview would have to be repeated.

It was made clear to us that a pass at OASC was good for a 12 month period after which it would have to be re done if commissioning was deferred for some reason.


#6

I would suggest that are not necessarily a good candidate for officer, if they decided to attend OASC without getting themselves to the basic fitness required to pass. Sounds like a lack of self motivation and determination which I would consider fundamental attributes for an officer to have, RAF or Air Cadets.


#7

If they passed everything else with flying colours I feel it is unfair for you to brand them as ‘not a good candidate’ based on fitness alone. It may have been one push up, or a second under time for the run. Don’t just assume they’re lazy or impotent.


#8

Depends who’s saying the “passed with flying colours” bit.

And as for the question, no. They’re being judged on different things, for different end purposes, by different staff.
One’s a potential warfighter. The other is a rather glorified babysitter.


#9

Sorry I wouldn’t agree. Have you seen a majority of officers in the air cadets? Overweight and not fit at all.


#10

The point isn’t about the persons physical fitness, it’s about their failure to prepare. If you can’t get the easy bit of OASC right are you suitable for a Leadership/Management role?


#11

Do you remember the tantrums when the fitness test was an advisory part of OASC for RAFAC officers


#12

Not the point I’m making. I have no issue with the candidate failing his fitness, it means he is not ready for military service. It also means that he failed to prepare adequately for a standard fitness test, the requirements of which are clearly stated. To me that could suggest a lack of self discipline and preparedness, which doesn’t suit an officer.


#13

We are not the military, that is why we have cadets in wheelchairs…


#14

i think that is unfair.

as indicated by @A400m we don’t know by how much the target was not reached by, this could be a single press-up or seconds on the run.
a head cold or minor injury occurring in the days/week prior to OASC could easily create a situation where a well prepared and fit candidate is compromised to the point where the pass/fail line is missed by a fraction…


#15

They have not successfully passed the OASC standard that was set for their commission, an NCO Aircrew OASC Pass would not be accepted for a commission (Regular of Cadet)

By all means they can become a CFAV, and should they wish to become an officer they can then complete the Cadet OASC.

Previously commission candidates have completed OASC (Or Single Service equivalent) and Initial Officer Training, and then been working in their trade for X Years.

While we remain a part of the RAF Family, we are our own organisation, with our own rules, and don’t necessarily want someone else’s rejects…


#16

So in one thread you’re unhappy with people criticising and making comments about people, yet fine to post that in this thread?


#17

Yes that’s right I am. You are entitled to your opinions like I am, but some of you are rude in the way you come across. Alot of officers are unfit and overweight but that does not mean they are unable to teach or plan activities or be a good officer. Some of you are too quick to judge and comment without getting full facts.


#18

Not sure what point you’re making. I initially said that lack of motivation and discipline would imply unsuitability for Air Cadet officer, but you seem to think I cared they were unfit. I don’t, fitness doesn’t matter to be an effective officer in the air cadets. So not entirely sure what your point is…


#19

Is this a hypothetical scenario, or a real case study?

Either way it seems like such a niche situation as to not really require its own policy.


#20

To be clear I’ve not said you’re not entitled to an opinion. I have said you shouldn’t be a hypocrite.