2018 Drill and Ceremonial Camp


#1

My squadron have recently told us about the drill and ceremonial camp

and I was wondering whether any cadets could give me an idea about the price the camp may be

and an cadets who went on the camp could give me an idea of what they did on the camp and what they thought of it

as I am interested in the camp

thank you


#2

Think it was about £65 last year. The warning order will have all the specific details in it when it’s released to Squadrons.


#3

:smiley: warning order…

You mean joining instructions.


#4

Give it a go I had two of my cadets attend last year and both of them thoroughly enjoyed it and came back better for the experience.


#5

Isn’t it a calling (some say warning) order first of all? Joining instructions are issued much further down the line upon allocation of places.


#6

Aye, for a standing patrol. Not a Cadet camp.


#7

Igore RAS he’s deliberately weary and you get used to it. There will be (or might have already have been) a warning order asking for applications, if selected you will then be sent Joining Instructions.


#8

There is a poster. The “admin order” is expected by the end of the month. I’m not yet sure what the application process will look like.


#9

Judging by the email that came from RHQ last week neither does my region.


#10

Latest general information I heard about it is thet there will NOT be a requirement for attendees to be cometent in arms drill - novices will be eligible to attend, as will those with existing arms drill experience, so long as their turnout and basic foot drill is up to scratch.

I anticipate that assessment by the WWO will again be a part of selection. I am not siure if the RWO will be involved this year as I’m not sure of its relevance.

How a cadet actualy applies in the first place is unknown. There may be a sharepoint form for squadrons to complete, or it may be an email return to the WWO in the first instance. I hope we find out soon


#11

TBH this should be open to all cadets and not a selection process. There are cadets all over that would love to do this and running just one, rather than across the full camp time period is an opportunity missed.

As a cadet who was ‘into’ all forms of drill, I couldn’t have thought of anything more dull and less inspiring. But then we had plenty of proper summer camps and the Corps didn’t have to make things up to try and make it look like there was something for the selfie loving senior officers to turn up to.


#12

TBH, you would not want to send a cadet on a week-long ceremonial drill camp where they will be working up to an armed parade unless you know their basic level of foot drill is of an acceptable standard, they have the potential (physically) to succeed and they fully understand what the goal is.

Sending a cadet who is not going to be able to cope with the demands will be disadvantaging those cadets who had a better chance of succeeding but who missed out because of a misplaced sense of fairness.

Everybody has the opportunity to attend if they meet the entry requirements, just like every other camp.

Also, the scale of the camp, as it stands, pretty much rules out having is run as 8 weeks of general camp experience. The place for smaller, more frequent, more basic drill camps is at wing or region.


#13

How much use is this and the band camp in the grand scheme of things? I’d bracket all “super camps” in these as well.
Who is it for; the cadets, or, the people running them to say, look what we can do aren’t we brilliant and then brown-nose with the Corps’ SLT.


#14

They are all for cadets to make up for the creeping lack of “proper” camp places due to the lack of air force these days.

Supercamps aim to spread the load for the stations and make it less likely that they will simply say No to cadets - apparently the stations like the format too.

The specialist camps also compensate for the air forces ineffectuality and provide a chance to go away and focus on an activity with like-minded people from further afield and have some fun. They tend to be well-received by the participants which is really the most important thing.

Aerospace camp is a back-slapping exercise.


#15

I’m hoping to go this year, it is seen as a immensely good camp and definitely one to have under your belt. If your drill standard is good, and want to make it even better, and add in elements such as rifle or sword, DNC is for you! One of our corparols attended last year and he enjoyed it very much, to some it may sound boring, I think the element of learning something new and expanding on your knowledge is most exciting! Price wise, I’d say around £60-70, although I am unsure.


#16

i think this could be said for any of the “Super camps” - D&C, Aerospace, Band, STEM, even JL (although a different style of “camp”)


#17

Good point ; are they all good camps to attend?


#18

And RIAT !!


#19

although RIAT classes as a “super camp” could be is considered a “specialist” camp in the same way as the others listed?
it is neither greens/fieldcraft based, blues/Drill Instructor based, Winged Master race based, or requires any other specific qualification (from a Staff point of view) to take part in/run the camp?
I should have included the shooting camp to the original list…

I am not sure RIAT matches the “element of learning something new and expanding on your knowledge” in as well defined manner than the rest…?


#20

But it is “Super” and is a “Camp”