Vehicle Weights


#1

Anyone happen to know the weight of a LWB Ford Transit Crew Cab 12 plate? We’re looking at a new SOV and want more than just D1 drivers to be able to drive it.

EDIT: Whilst I think about it we’re looking at other 8/9 seat versions of the Transit so if anyone has a handy reference point for weights they can direct me to that’d be appreciated.


#2

Google is your friend…


#3

It’s proved fruitless so far, or at least the information I have been able to find is gibberish to me.


#4

your should be ok.
from memory it doesn’t breech 3.5tonnes MLW unless its a transit Jumbo


#5

The vast majority of Crew Cabs can be driven on a normal car licence because they have 8 or less passenger seats and are less than 3500kg GVM.

I drive hired MoD ones all the time on my B cat licence and never had a problem. Unless there is something special inside the particular van you are looking at you should be OK.

If you are still not sure, ask the seller to show you this plate. You can normally see it when you open the passenger side door:


If the top number is 3500kg or less, you are fine.

For a squadron owned vehicle which has a permit 19, you can drive anything up to 16 passenger seats, as long as it is 3500kg or below. Some Ford minibuses with 14 seats can be driven on a car licence with a permit 19.

Hope that helps!


#6

I am pretty sure the permit 19 has a limit on the gross laden weight rather than unladen

I am unsure what the weight is but with a busfull of kids and kits you could go over it theoretically


#7

From https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/section-19-and-22-permits-not-for-profit-passenger-transport/section-19-and-22-permits-not-for-profit-passenger-transport

ii) Drivers who passed their car test on or after 1st January 1997.

Drivers who pass their car test on or after this date are no longer granted D1 entitlement. Category B entitles them to drive a small bus but only if all of the following conditions are met:

they have held a full category B car licence for at least 2 years
they receive no payment or other consideration for driving other than out-of-pocket expenses
the vehicle has a maximum gross weight not exceeding 3.5 tonnes (4.25 tonnes including specialised equipment for the carriage of disabled passengers)
for drivers aged 70 or over, that they don’t have any medical conditions which would disqualify them from eligibility for a D1 licence
no trailer is being towed
where the driver’s licence only authorises the driving of vehicles with automatic transmission, that only a vehicle with automatic transmission is used

I am 90% sure that Gross weight refers to laden although i am sure someone will correct me!


#8

From https://www.gov.uk/vehicle-weights-explained

Maximum authorised mass
Maximum authorised mass (MAM) means the weight of a vehicle or trailer including the maximum load that can be carried safely when it’s being used on the road.

This is also known as gross vehicle weight (GVW) or permissible maximum weight.

It will be listed in the owner’s manual and is normally shown on a plate or sticker fitted to the vehicle.

The plate or sticker may also show a gross train weight (GTW), also sometimes called gross combination weight (GCW). This is the total weight of the tractor unit plus trailer plus load.


#9

We’re sticking to something cat B drivers can drive without the additional permits but thanks anyway.


#10

ok so it is not the 2012 plate vehicle but…

shows

Now i doubt the old model would be any heavier - and with the known 3500kg threshold why make it heavier?


#11

it didnt take much to find a 2012 model

see http://www.pjnicholls.com/pdfs/transit.pdf

or

(from the above link)


#12

Much appreciated guys.


#13

If you get a minibus-lite (advertised in the back of Air Cadet Magazine). As long you get the 17 seat option with removeable seats it can be driven on a B Licence. (You do need a Permit 19, but that is literally a 1 page form to HQAC)

Gives you upto 4.25 Tonnes vehicle weight and you can drive it on a B Licence.


#14

3,500 is the laden weight!


#15

Hi all,
Good advice on here. PLEASE be careful not to overload your vehicle, Peugeot Boxers are on average lighter than Transits, I have a fleet of both and people are correct B1 class drivers can only drive UPTO 3500Kg’s THIS IS THE maximum allowed mass. So you need to find the “Kerb Weight” take that away from the MAM and that will give you the load capacity. There was a letter issued by the DofT on 31st July 17 stating they are looking into Permit 19 & 22’s and the expected outcome will be the removal of permit 19’s. This will mean (in my case) all drivers will require CPC licences. It is worth getting in touch with your local MTTT&L Section for advice. If you think of using a vehicle under 3500kg,s and to increase the load carrying capacity you use a trailer, B1 drivers are not allowed to tow and D1+E (pre Jan 97) drivers must take into account the “Train Weight” of both trailer and tow vehicle. It is rapidly turning into a mine field…


#16

Some sound advice there, I wasn’t aware of P29&22s being looked into - that could give us a challenge in the future.


#17

This one? https://tinyurl.com/y9dplb7p


#18

Hi Batfink, Yes that is the kiddy. I’m a member of the Community Transport Association and it is that concerning they have set up 5 nation wide seminars to discuss it before going to the DofT.


#19

Don’t forget if you have a minibus light with the removeable seats and ramp you can go to 4.25 Tonnes


#20

Worth pointing out too that’s weight of everything in/on the vehicle, so you need to allow for passengers, driver, fuel, etc.

So a one-tonne payload won’t allow you to carry 1,000kg of cargo, probably more like 800 even with only the driver on board.