CFAV Fitness


#81

What defines competent?

Nuts … beaten to it again![/quote]

Must be because of your fat cubby fingers mashing the keys in reply ;)[/quote]
Absolutely


#82

Any formally appointed member of staff are able to organise/supervise these basic sports/exercise activities.


#83

Removed as cannot anonymise the subject of my post


#84

Yep. By being obese they are showing children that it is acceptable to be a fat knacker, which it is not. Look how much obesity is costing us as the taxpayers.


#85

Yep. By being obese they are showing children that it is acceptable to be a fat knacker, which it is not. Look how much obesity is costing us as the taxpayers.[/quote]

It’s not ‘acceptable’? By which definition of civilised society is it not acceptable? Advisable I may grant you. But acceptable??
What is acceptable? Are skinny people not acceptable? People who are too short?


#86

Don’t start me on short people… everyone knows theyre little hitlers with short person syndrome.

But you’ve left out the least acceptable group of the lot… Gingers shudder

:whistle:


#87

Don’t start me on short people… everyone knows theyre little hitlers with short person syndrome.

But you’ve left out the least acceptable group of the lot… Gingers shudder

:whistle:[/quote]

Hair Colour, how could I forget! I expect the only ‘acceptable’ hair colour is blonde. (With blue eyes naturally)


#88

The athletic, blond hair blue eyes look is overrated…

Apparrently.


#89

[quote=“MattB” post=1972]It is - like so many ‘rules’ that everyone ‘knows’ - utter horse.[/quote] Indeed! I hear it A LOT! I’d love to know where it’s come from? :ohmy:

[quote=“MattB” post=1972]The bit about punishments is in another ACP, basically there are only certain things allowed as punishments (verbal reprimand, extra duties, suspension and dismissal) and physical activity is - IIRC - specifically mentioned as not being allowed. Whether you’re a PTI or not.[/quote].
Exactly.

Now here’s an intersting point. That says that “[Adult staff] may supervise exercises which involve physical contact”. Though I’m sure the intention was to authorise ‘exercises which DO NOT involve physical contact’. I do wish HQAC would employ people who can write properly.

[quote=“MattB” post=1972]Edited to add - if any competent member of adult staff does want to run the RAFFT, https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B_IWEVvpO_4BcnBmelZHTlU3bmc includes all of the details, including a risk assessment![/quote]Cheers for that!

EDIT - Spotted a problem. Page 29, Para 3007 a: “This is a timed sit-up test; you are to perform as many press-ups as you can…”


#90

As cringe-worthy as the sight of obese people wearing the Queen’s uniform is, the practical reality is that without them the ACO will fold like a deckchair.

That having been said, I echo the idea of having health and fitness requirements for any CFAV who is partaking in, or supervising physical activity, such as adventure training. I’m on a BEL course at the moment and it’s no exaggeration to say that the physically weakest people on the hills every weekend are tutors, some of whom are incapable of keeping a 4kph pace over fairly innocuous terrain. If you cannot lead by example, be in a position to be able to get your cadets moving faster and harder or cannot be relied upon to stay strong when others are in trouble, then you have no business leading people.

And, for the record, there are weight limits in the ACO, so the precedent has been set. Anyone who wants to serve as an instructor at a VGS has to be able to weigh in at 103kg/16st3 or under when dressed. :wink:


#91

Yep. By being obese they are showing children that it is acceptable to be a fat knacker, which it is not. Look how much obesity is costing us as the taxpayers.[/quote]

You are totally right. It’s costing us much less than allowing those healthy people to carry on living until they are 95 and raiding the non existent pension pot. The fat knackers may cost a bit in diabetes or high BP meds but they shuffle off much earlier and save us loads.


#92

Well, if we’re going down this track, then smokers and drinkers should go too… very poor examples to cadets and young people.


#93

[quote=“James Blonde” post=2009]Well, if we’re going down this track, then smokers and drinkers should go too… very poor examples to cadets and young people.[/quote]Agreed.


#94

Although, playing devil’s advocate… those people can simply not drink nor smoke around cadets. It’s somewhat harder to switch off obesity for the duration.


#95

You’ve obviously never worn a corset.


#96

i would agree as so far as visually it shouldnt be seen, thus “accepted” to be an example.

i dont think smokers, Staff or Cadets, should be seen to be smoking in uniform, at the very least “hidden out of view”

i would not expect any Staff member to be freely drinking in front of Cadets, in my experience this is only done in seperate quarters away from Cadet eyes.

as such both examples are not readily seen, and done so in a environment which can be controlled

the size of someone’s waist is however always visable and thus a different topic.
whether on a Standard Parade night, a weekend exercise, public event or formal parade the size/shape/visual health of all are there to be seen, and thus an issue of not just an “example” being set by a role model (staff) but has implications on the public opinion at the same time.

Edit: wdimagineer2b beat me to it!


#97

You’ve obviously never worn a corset.[/quote]

You obviously have! :sick:


#98

So we need to decide, as an organisation if the reason for a waistline witchhunt is because we think it looks bad or if it’s a bad example to cadets. As we’ve noted already, if we start to go down a public health route, we run into other obstacles. such as drinking, smoking etc. As an organisation we cannot single out one activity as being unhealthy and ‘unacceptable’ without looking hypocritical.

This is why I believe the policy promulgated this week is actually a very clever and effective route to take. By making weight a uniform issue, as opposed to a health issue, the ACO is not overtly enforcing a healthy living standard.

By enforcing uniform standards to the letter, and removing the privilege for people who do not fit into their uniform, (note that the policy mentions weight gain AND weight loss.) actually adds a financial incentive to weight loss (or gain). Particularly for Officers, who have to purchase all new uniform. it’s probably cheaper to lose weight than it is to purchase a tailored set of large no 1s.


#99

You’ve obviously never worn a corset.[/quote]

You obviously have! :sick:[/quote]

Yes, costume museum at Bath. Excellent for posture as well.


#100

[quote=“wdimagineer2b” post=1998][quote=“MattB” post=1972]Edited to add - if any competent member of adult staff does want to run the RAFFT, https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B_IWEVvpO_4BcnBmelZHTlU3bmc includes all of the details, including a risk assessment![/quote]Cheers for that!

EDIT - Spotted a problem. Page 29, Para 3007 a: “This is a timed sit-up test; you are to perform as many press-ups as you can…”[/quote]Cheers, corrected.